Akbar's Tomb


This mausoleum is situated on the out skirts of the Agra City. It houses the mortal remains of the Mughal Emperor Akbar, who, during his lifetime itself had completed the tomb and laid out a beautiful garden. However, the topmost portion of mausoleum in marble was constructed by his son, Jahangir.

The shape of tomb is pyramidal and consists of five storeys. The cenotaph is at a level below the ground level, while the false cenotaph is at the top floor. The entire tomb is constructed of red sandstone but for the top storey which is constructed in white marble. The ground floor is surrounded by cloisters except at the centre on the southern side. These cloisters are divided by massive arches and piers divisible into many bays.

The square storeys have arcaded verandah, with arcades and cluster of kiosks on each side. Some of the kiosks in second storey have marble pyramidal roofs while the rest are crowned by cupolas. Each angle at the third storey has a small square room.

The top most storey is entirely made up of white marble. It has a square court, which is open to sky. The central courtyard is enclosed in all the sides by slender arches and piers and divided into bays, which has been roofed in the trabeate pattern. At the centre of the courtyard lies a square platform, over which a white marble cenotaph is laid out. This cenotaph is profusely carved with arabesque and floral patterns.

History


The tomb of akbar was built by his son prince Salim also called Jahangir. Akbar planned the tomb and selected a suitable site for it. After his death, Akbar's son Jahangir completed the construction in 1605–1613.

Akbar was one of the greatest emperors in the history of India. However, during the reign of His great-grandson, Aurangzeb, the rebellious Jats under the leadership of Raja Ram Jat, ransacked the intricate tomb, plundered and looted all the beautiful gold, jewels, silver and carpets, whilst destroying other things. He even, in order to avenge his father Gokula's death, plundered Akbar's tomb, looted it and dragged Akbar's bones and burned them in retaliation. He was later sentenced to death by Aurangzeb.

The Tomb has suffered a lot, until extensive repair was carried out by the British under Lord Curzon. The neighbouring Taj Mahal was also looted, and two of Agra's gates were taken away.

Entrance Fee: Indians Visitors: (Total- Rs.20) Indian Rs. 15/- per head (ASI); Rs. 5/- per head as Toll Tax (Agra Development Authority)


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